Self-Interned, 1942: Noguchi in Poston War Relocation Center

January 18, 2017 10:00 amtoJanuary 7, 2018 6:00 pm

 

Isamu Noguchi, The Noguchi Museum, NYC, Japan, Queens, internment, internment camps, War Relocation Center, WWII, Executive Order 9066, Day of Remembrance, art, exhibition

“Yellow Landscape” by Isamu Noguchi. Photo by Kevin Noble.

Self-Interned, 1942: Noguchi in Poston War Relocation Center

Wednesday, January 18, 2017 until Sunday, January 7, 2018

The Noguchi Museum – 32-37 Vernon Boulevard, Long Island City

Admission: $10/$5 seniors and students

The Noguchi Museum explores its namesake’s experience in a Japanese American internment camp in the exhibition Self-Interned, 1942: Noguchi in Poston War Relocation Center, commemorating the 75th anniversary of Executive Order 9066, the notorious wartime directive signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on February 19, 1942. The order authorized the internment of more than 120,000 Japanese Americans living on the West Coast.

Although Isamu Noguchi was exempt from internment because he was a resident of New York, he made the extraordinary decision to enter the Poston War Relocation Center in the Arizona desert, hoping to contribute something positive to this forcibly displaced community, to which he had never felt more connected. In Noguchi’s words, “Thus I willfully became part of humanity uprooted.”

Curated by Noguchi Museum Senior Curator Dakin Hart, Self-Interned, 1942 is a year-long exhibition that brings together about two dozen works from the Museum’s collection, dating from before, during, and after Noguchi’s time at Poston, along with a substantial selection of archival documents. Together these evoke this harrowing moment in the history of American democracy, while revealing the impact that Noguchi’s experience at Poston had on his art.

Public Program
The Noguchi Museum will offer free admission all day Sunday, February 19, the Day of Remembrance. At 3:00 p.m., artist Kimi Maeda will present her solo performance, Bend.

For more information, please visit the Noguchi Museum’s website.