The 12th Annual Concert of Japanese Heritage Music

April 2, 2017
4:00 pmto6:00 pm

 

 

Gagaku, Columbia University, medieval music, Institute for Medieval Japanese Studies

From left to right: Takeshi Sasamoto Hitomi Nakamura and Mayumi Miyata

The 12th Annual Concert of Japanese Heritage Music: Glories of Japanese Music Heritage

Sunday, April 2 from 4:00 p.m. until 6:00 p.m. (Doors open at 3:30 p.m.)

Miller Theater, Columbia University – Broadway at 116th Street

Admission: Free

Founded in 1968, the Institute for Medieval Japanese Studies is an international liaison and research center designed primarily to serve European and American scholars in all disciplines whose main area of study focuses on pre-Meiji era Japan.

The overall purpose of the Institute is to encourage research on neglected aspects of pre-modern Japanese civilization, especially during the medieval period (primarily, but not exclusively, the Kamakura and Muromachi periods 1185-1600).

IMJS will present its 12th annual concert, featuring gagaku, which is ancient Japanese imperial court music, as well as works by non-Japanese composers for traditional Japanese instruments.

PROGRAM
PART I
GAGAKU: SACRED SOUNDSCAPES REBORN

Hyōjō no netori (Prelude Mode Centering on the note of E)
Etenraku (Music of the Divine Heavens)

An Introduction to listening to Etenraku

Hyōjō no netori (Prelude Mode Centering on the note of E)
Etenraku (Music of the Divine Heavens) (Repeated)

Kashin (This Auspicious Day)

Ichikotsuchō no chōshi (Prelude Mode Centering on the note of D)
Konju no jo (Ah, Cheers – Overture)
Konju no ha (Ah, Cheers – Unfolding)

Performed by Columbia Gagaku Ensemble New York and joined by the three instructors Louise Sasaki (ryūteki), Noriyuki Sasaki (hichiriki), Yōichi Fukui (shō); the three mentor-artists Mayumi Miyata (shō), Hitomi Nakamura (hichiriki), Takeshi Sasamoto (ryūteki); the 2014 Tokyo Global Artist in Residence, Rosamund Plummer, Sydney Symphony Orchestra flutist/piccoloist (ryūteki); the 2016 Tokyo Global Artist in Residence, Jinny Shaw, U.K. Hallé Orchestra oboist (shō); and the 2016 Mentor/Protégé Summer Program alumnus Devon Tipp (hichiriki).

Gagaku, Columbia University, medieval music, Institute for Medieval Japanese Studies

From left to right: Elizabeth Brown, Basil Athanasiadis and Marty Regan

PART II
CONTEMPORARY WORKS BY NON-JAPANESE COMPOSERS

Elizabeth Brown, Rubicon (2009) for shō, hichiriki and ryuteki
Performed by Zachary Karen (shō), Kevin Tien (hichiriki), Lish Lindsey (ryūteki)

Basil Athanasiadis, Interrupted Dreams (2010) for shō and 21-string koto
Performed by Mayumi Miyata (shō), Yumi Kurosawa (21-string koto)

Marty Regan, Magic Mirror (2008) for shamisen, hichiriki, ryūteki, shō, shinobue and shakuhachi
Performed by Yoko Reikano Kimura (shamisen), Hitomi Nakamura (hichiriki), Takeshi Sasamoto (ryūteki), Mayumi Miyata (shō), Kaoru Watanabe (shinobue), James Nyoraku Schlefer (shakuhachi)

Gagaku, Columbia University, medieval music, Institute for Medieval Japanese Studies

From left to right: Yumi Kurosawa, Kaoru Watanabe, James Nyoraku Schlefer and Yoko Reikano Kimura

The performance is free, but registration is encouraged. To RSVP, please visit IMJS’s website.