Solidarity Against the US-Japan Nuclear Energy Cooperation Agreement

June 17, 2017
11:45 amto4:00 pm

 

 

nuclear energy, NYC, Japan, US, treaty, nuclear weapons, anti-nuke, Veterans For Peace Chapter 34 (NYC), Granny Peace Brigade, Ribbon International, Peace and Justice in the Teachings of Hahm, Pax Christi Metro New York

Solidarity Against the US-Japan Nuclear Energy Cooperation Agreement

Saturday, June 17 at noon

The steps of the New York Library – Fifth Avenue at 42nd Street

Admission: Free

Several peace organizations including the Manhattan Project for a Nuclear-Free World, Veterans For Peace Chapter 34 (NYC), Granny Peace Brigade, Ribbon International, Peace and Justice in the Teachings of Hahm, and Pax Christi Metro New York are hosting a peaceful gathering and march in solidarity with citizens against the US-Japan Nuclear Energy Cooperation Agreement. The group will meet on the steps of the New York Public Library at 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue at 11:45 a.m. and will march to the U.N. in support of the Women’s March to Ban the Bomb.

The US-Japan Nuclear Energy Cooperation Agreement (officially named the Agreement for Cooperation Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of Japan Concerning Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy) determines how nuclear energy-related information, technology, nuclear material, equipment, components, services, spent fuel, and more are handled in order to promote nuclear energy in Japan. The treaty became effective in July 1988 with a 30-year maturity date and will be automatically extended unless one of the two participating countries notifies the other country six months prior to the termination. If the agreement is extended in July 2018, Japan will continue to promote nuclear energy as its energy policy. The Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant, a controversial facility in Japan, will be started in the fall of 2018. Japan will continue to be able to reprocess spent fuel, which is not allowed in any other non-nuclear weapon state and creates tensions among countries in Northeast Asia. Japan currently has 48 tons of separated plutonium, and its government has been unclear about how this will be used, stored, and disposed. Japan could become a potential nuclear-weapon state.

Read the current agreement here.

All concerned citizens of Japan and the United States are invited and encouraged to join the march, which seeks to create awareness about the treaty and the steps US citizens can take to stop its automatic extension.