Japanese Dessert Shop Reopens in New Home at Industry City

You may recall Tadaima dessert shop from our 2021 Holiday Gift Guide.  After a two-month hiatus they have now reopened in their gorgeous new space, just down the hall in Industry City’s The Makers Guild.  The new shop’s facade looks like it was transported from Japan with signage in the form of a traditional Japanese andon lantern and intricate woodwork framing the windows. Owner Ayaka … Continue reading Japanese Dessert Shop Reopens in New Home at Industry City

Hakata Amaou: Japan’s “King of Strawberry”

What comes to mind when you think of Fukuoka? I usually think of Hakata ramen. I’m reminded of the yatai that line the streets along the river in Fukuoka City, selling deep, steaming bowls of the tonkotsu-style ramen with its rich, creamy broth made of pork bones. Fukuoka Prefecture, located on the island of Kyushu in the southwestern part of Japan, is also known for … Continue reading Hakata Amaou: Japan’s “King of Strawberry”
3.11 Japanese Food Drive

3.11 Japanese Food Drive

The Consulate General of Japan in New York and The Japanese American Association of New York, Inc. welcome support from the community for their Japanese food drive for Food Bank for NYC. With the eleventh anniversary of the earthquake/tsunami/nuclear disaster in Tohoku approaching, the organizations hope to commemorate the tragedy of March 11 by collecting donations of non-perishable Japanese food and giving them to New … Continue reading 3.11 Japanese Food Drive

The Obligatory Chocolate of Japanese Valentine’s Day

Today is Valentine’s Day! It’s the day when men feel obligated to buy flowers, candy, jewelry, and cards for the women in their lives. But Valentine’s Day has a different meaning to the Japanese. In Japan, women are the gift givers. Standard procedure in Japan is for women to buy chocolate for men. The Japanese refer to these goodies as giri choco. Giri is Japanese … Continue reading The Obligatory Chocolate of Japanese Valentine’s Day

Setsubun: the Birth of Spring on February 3

The Japanese may have switched to the Gregorian calendar in 1873 during the Meiji Restoration, but they still observe the seasonality of the Lunar calendar. One such observance is Setsubun, which occurs on February 3. While Oshogatsu, or the Japanese New Year holiday, takes place on January 1 and 2, still look to Setsubun as a New Year “cleansing,” in alignment with the Lunar New … Continue reading Setsubun: the Birth of Spring on February 3