Adam Isfendiyar, photography, Ainu, Japan, Hokkaido, NYC, Japan Society, New York Day of Remembrance, American Indian Community House, JAA, ICP Museum

Master—An Ainu Story with Photographer Adam Isfendiyar at Japan Society 🗓 🗺

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Master—An Ainu Story with Photographer Adam Isfendiyar

Thursday, May 23 from 6:30 p.m. until 8:00 p.m.

Japan Society 333 E. 47th Street (between 1st and 2nd Avenues)

Admission: Free

Master—An Ainu Story, a photographic documentary by Adam Isfendiyar, tells the story of the Ainu people and the life of Kenji Matsuda, a member of the Ainu community in Hokkaido, Japan’s northernmost prefecture. Isfendiyar’s talk covers a brief history of the Ainu people and his experiences working within the Ainu community as a photographer.

Adam Isfendiyar is a London-based photographer with a passion for telling the unique stories of individuals and their connection to their environment. He has spent the last eight years living in Japan, working on commercial projects as well as self-directed documentaries, including Dancing In The Streets—A Story of Homelessness in Tokyo and Master—An Ainu Story.

This is a free event for members of Japan Society, but registration is required through Eventbrite. Please click this ticket link to register. To become a member of Japan Society, please visit Japan Society’s website.

Master—An Ainu Story with Photographer Adam Isfendiyar is co-presented by American Indian Community House, New York Day of Remembrance, JAANY (The Japanese American Association of New York), and Japan Society. The talk will be followed by a reception.

Adam Isfendiyar, photography, Ainu, Japan, Hokkaido, NYC, Japan Society, New York Day of Remembrance, American Indian Community House, JAA, ICP Museum
“Exodus” by Adam Isfendiyar

Isfendiyar’s photographs from Master—An Ainu Story will be on view at ICP – International Center of Photography from Tuesday, May 21 through Monday, 27. ICP is located at 250 Bowery.

During the day, the installment can be viewed on monitors inside the ICP Museum and during evening hours, images are literally “projected” onto the windows of the ICP Museum and can be viewed from the sidewalk outside the Museum. The photographs are most visible after sunset. For more information, please visit ICP’s website.